Pennsylvania's Promise for Children

 

Build ECE News header, v. January 2013

 

November 25, 2009

Special Announcement

  • Infant Entrapment and Suffocation Prompts Stork Craft to Recall More Than 2.1 Million Drop-Side Cribs

Trends & Reports

  • Report Highlights Early Childhood Advisory Councils and Federal Efforts to Promote Policy Alignment in Early Childhood
  • Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood:  Paths Toward Excellence and Equity
  • Early Lessons - Podcast about the Perry Preschool Project
  • NBER Working Paper - The Rate of Return to the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program
  • New National Guidance on Early Childhood Inclusion
  • Leadership Development in Early Childhood Care and Education: A View of the Current Landscape

OCDEL Corner

  • PA Department of Health Announcing Clinics for H1N1 Vaccine
  • The Early Learning Challenge: Raising the Bar - Remarks from Secretary Arne Duncan
  • Pennsylvania Receives Nearly $19 million Recovery Act Funds to Expand Early Head Start Programs

In the Community

  • Kurt Kondrich to Receive the 2009 ITCA Regional Parent Leadership Award
  • Mercer County Hosts Economic Summit on Early Childhood Investments

Upcoming Events

  • 2009 Events
  • Webinar on Assessing the Economic Impact of Child Care During Recessionary Times - December 9, 2009
  • Webinar: What’s New with the Early Childhood Standards? - November 2009 - February 2010

Employment Opportunities

  • Pre-School Program Specialist - PA Key (South Central PA)
  • Pre-School Program Specialist - PA Key (Southeast PA)
  • PA Key Infant/Toddler Supervisor – PA Key
  • PA Key Infant/Toddler Specialist - PA Key
  • PA Key Project Manager – PA Key

Resources for Early Learning Professionals

  • Teaching with Primary Sources 
  • Understanding the "Silent Period" with English Language Learners
  • Read Kiddo Read

  

Special Announcement

On November 23, 2009, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) issued a recall of over 2 million cribs.  Television news programs are featuring this recall information on their programs.  The recall issued by the CPSC appears below.

Please carefully review the information below to determine whether this recall impacts cribs at your child care facility.  Additionally, you may want to provide this information to parents so they can check any cribs that are in their homes.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), in cooperation with Stork Craft Manufacturing Inc., of British Columbia, Canada, announced on November 23, 2009, the voluntary recall of more than 2.1 million Stork Craft drop-side cribs, including about 147,000 Stork Craft drop-side cribs with the Fisher-Price logo. The recall involves approximately 1,213,000 units distributed in the United States and 968,000 units distributed in Canada.

CPSC urges parents and caregivers to immediately stop using the recalled cribs, wait for the free repair kit, and do not attempt to fix the cribs without the kit. They should find an alternative, safe sleeping environment for their baby. Consumers should contact Stork Craft to receive a free repair kit that converts the drop-side on these cribs to a fixed side.

The cribs' drop-side plastic hardware can break, deform, or parts can become missing. In addition, the drop-side can be installed upside-down, which can result in broken or disengaged plastic parts. All of these problems can cause the drop-side to detach in one or more corners. When the drop-side detaches, it creates space between the drop-side and the crib mattress. The bodies of infants and toddlers can become entrapped in the space which can lead to suffocation. Complete detachment of drop-sides can lead to falls from the crib.

CPSC, Health Canada, and Stork Craft are aware of 110 incidents of drop-side detachment; 67 incidents occurred in the United States and 43 in Canada. The incidents include 15 entrapments; 12 in the U.S. and three in Canada. Four of the entrapments resulted in suffocation: a 7-month-old in Gouverneur, N.Y.; a 7-month-old in New Iberia, La.; a 6-month-old in Summersville, W.Va.; and a 9-month-old in Bronx, N.Y. Included in these incidents are 20 falls from cribs; 12 in the U.S. and eight in Canada. Fall injuries ranged from concussion to bumps and bruises. The cribs involved in these incidents had plastic drop-side hardware that had broken, missing, or deformed claws, connectors, tracks, or flexible tab stops; loose or missing metal spring clips; stripped screws; and/or drop-sides installed upside-down.

This recall involves Stork Craft drop-side cribs and Stork Craft drop-side cribs with the Fisher-Price logo. This recall does not involve any cribs that do not have a drop-side. This recall does not involve any cribs with metal rod drop-side hardware. It involves only those cribs with plastic trigger and one-hand-system drop-side hardware.

This recall includes Stork Craft cribs with manufacturing and distribution dates between January 1993 and October 2009. This recall also includes Stork Craft cribs with the Fisher-Price logo that have manufacturing dates between October 1997 and December 2004. The Stork Craft cribs with the Fisher-Price logo were first sold in the U.S. in July 1998 and in Canada in September 1998. The cribs were sold in various styles and finishes. The manufacture date, model number, crib name, country of origin, and the firm's name, address, and contact information are located on the assembly instruction sheet attached to the mattress support board. The firm's insignia "storkcraft baby" or "storkling" is inscribed on the drop-side teething rail of some cribs. In Stork Craft cribs that contain the "Fisher-Price" logo, this logo can be found on the crib's teething rail, in the manufacturer's instructions, on the assembly instruction sheet attached to the mattress support board, and on the end panels of the Twinkle-Twinkle and Crystal crib models.

Major retailers in the United States and Canada sold the recalled cribs including BJ's Wholesale Club, J.C. Penney, Kmart, Meijer, Sears, USA Baby, and Wal-Mart stores and online at Amazon.com, Babiesrus.com, Costco.com, Target.com, and Walmart.com from January 1993 through October 2009 for between $100 and $400.

The cribs were manufactured in Canada, China and Indonesia.

For additional information, contact Stork Craft toll-free at (877) 274-0277 or via the Stork Craft website to order the free repair kit.

Important Message from CPSC:  CPSC would like to remind parents not to use any crib with missing, broken, or loose parts. Make sure to tighten hardware from time to time to keep the crib sturdy. When using a drop-side crib, parents should check to make sure the drop-side or any other moving part operates smoothly. Always check all sides and corners of the crib for disengagement. Any disengagement can create a gap and entrap a child. In addition, do not try to repair any side of the crib, especially with tape, wire or rope.

To see this recall, including pictures of the recalled product, please go to the CPSC website.

Firm's Recall Hotline: (877) 274-0277
CPSC Recall Hotline: (800) 638-2772
CPSC Media Contact: (301) 504-7908
HC Media Contact: (613) 957-2983 

Trends & Reports

The New America Foundation released a new report, The Next Step in Systems-Building: Early Childhood Advisory Councils and Federal Efforts to Promote Policy Alignment in Early Childhood.  (pdf).

The Head Start Reauthorization Act of 2007 mandates that governors designate an Early Childhood Advisory Council (ECAC) to develop a coordinated system of early childhood education and care.  ECACs are state-level councils whose purpose is to support and advise state policymakers as they work to create strong, aligned, and comprehensive systems of services for young children aged birth to 5, and their families. ECACs are more than groups of people convening for regular meetings. They are a way to develop and implement an actionable plan to achieve a common goal: to ensure that all children in the state are healthy, thriving, and ready to learn.

For the full report (pdf), please visit the New America Foundation website.

Early childhood mathematics is vitally important for young children's present and future educational success. Research has demonstrated that virtually all young children have the capability to learn and become competent in mathematics. Furthermore, young children enjoy their early informal experiences with mathematics. Unfortunately, many children's potential in mathematics is not fully realized, especially those children who are economically disadvantaged. This is due, in part, to a lack of opportunities to learn mathematics in early childhood settings or through everyday experiences in the home and in their communities. Improvements in early childhood mathematics education can provide young children with the foundation for school success.

Relying on a comprehensive review of the research, Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood lays out the critical areas that should be the focus of young children's early mathematics education, explores the extent to which they are currently being incorporated in early childhood settings, and identifies the changes needed to improve the quality of mathematics experiences for young children. This book serves as a call to action to improve the state of early childhood mathematics. It will be especially useful for policy makers and practitioners-those who work directly with children and their families in shaping the policies that affect the education of young children.

Although the book is available for purchase, it can be read online for free by visiting the website of The National Academies Press.

The Perry Preschool Project was the first major study to examine the impact of a high-quality preschool program on the lives of African American children who were born in poverty. A new podcast on American RadioWorks, entitled Early Lessons by Emily Hanford, discusses the experiences of people directly involved in the project. It includes interviews with teachers who were at the school and personal descriptions of what the experience was like.

For more information and to access the podcast, go to the website for American RadioWorks

The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) has published a new Working Paper, entitled The Rate of Return to the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program (November 2009), by James J. Heckman, Seong Hyeok Moon, Rodrigo Pinto, Peter A. Savelyev, Adam Yavitz.

This paper estimates the rate of return to the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program, an early intervention program targeted toward disadvantaged African-American youth. Estimates of the rate of return to the Perry program are widely cited to support the claim of substantial economic benefits from preschool education programs. Previous studies of the rate of return to this program ignore the compromises that occurred in the randomization protocol. They do not report standard errors. The rates of return estimated in this paper account for these factors. Conducted was an extensive analysis of sensitivity to alternative plausible assumptions. Estimated social rates of return generally fall between 7-10 percent, with most estimates substantially lower than those previously reported in the literature. However, returns are generally statistically significantly different from zero for both males and females and are above the historical return on equity. Estimated benefit-to-cost ratios support this conclusion.

To read an abstract or to download the full report, go to the website for The National Bureau of Economic Research.

Pennsylvania is one of 8 states supported by the National Professional Development Center on Inclusion (NPDCI) and NPDCI facilitated the development of a new position paper on early childhood inclusion between NAEYC and DEC. The article (pdf), New National Guidance on Early Childhood Inclusion, includes some great links to learn more about this statement and definition.

Dr. Stacie Goffin, with Kim Means, has just released a compendium of early care and education leadership development programs in the United States.  This compendium, Leadership Development in Early Childhood Care and Education: A View of the Current Landscape is available online at The Goffin Strategy Group website.

The compendium includes a description of  86 early care and education leadership development programs across the country and provides information about the purpose, focus, and funding of these programs, as well as an overview of findings. Dr. Goffin considers this compendium as a work in progress. If there are other early care and education leadership initiatives that should be included, contact her at eceleadership@gmail.com to share the information.

OCDEL Corner

The Department of Public Welfare is providing all facilities licensed by the Department with an important press release from the Department of Health announcing 60 clinics in Pennsylvania opening December 1 through December 3 for individuals in the recommended priority groups to receive the H1N1 vaccine.  The clinics will be held at the 60 State Health Centers (pdf).  The clinics will be opened from 2pm-6pm on these three days.  Individuals must pre-register for these clinics beginning on Monday November 30, 2009by calling 1-877-PA-HEALTH or visiting the website for the PA Department of Health to pre-register for the clinics.

Please continue to visit PA DOH's H1N1 website to access the most current information on the H1N1 virus and vaccine in Pennsylvania.

On November 18, 2009, the U.S. Department of Education published remarks made by Secretary Arne Duncan at the annual conference of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, in which he discussed current challenges and changes that are taking place across the country in early learning and development programs.

In his speech, Duncan highlights details about the Early Learning Challenge Fund, in which a select group of states that have already invested in developing high-quality early learning systems would be eligible to receive Quality Pathway grants to expand their systems into models of reform and excellence. A second group of states would be eligible for Development Grants to strengthen and expand the foundation of their early learning programs and help launch a standards-based, outcome-driven system. Also provided was information that the Department of Education adoption of a birth through 3rd grade early learning agenda that embraces the full range of early childhood development.

Pennsylvania's work in early childhood is one of the states highlighted in the speech.  "Pennsylvania's Pre-K Counts program has taken some 10,000 high-risk and vulnerable children and shown significant gains in spoken language and daily living skills. A new study of the program finds that 80 percent of PKC children are meeting Pennsylvania's Early Learning Standards for kindergarten readiness, and the program has dramatically reduced special education placements."

To view the full speech, please visit the website of the U.S. Department of Education

Nearly 1,600 more children across the state will benefit from the expansion of Early Head Start services funded by $18.6 million in federal Recovery Act funds, Education Secretary Gerald L. Zahorchak and Public Welfare Secretary Estelle B. Richman announced on November 24, 2009.

The funds were awarded to 19 providers by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

“A critical focus of the federal recovery program was to bolster education, and making investments in early childhood education is one of the smartest strategies,” Zahorchak said. “These grants will aid tremendously in our ongoing efforts to build a strong, quality early education continuum for Pennsylvania’s children and families.”

Richman said the impact of recovery funding already is evident in Pennsylvania’s communities, where it has been used to restore and sustain programs that might otherwise have suffered cuts. She said the additional funds for Early Head Start will further build on those benefits.

“Being able to use these grants to further build our educational support network will help to ensure we reach our children and their families at the most important times in their development, giving them the gift of opportunity and a chance to build a stronger foundation to start from in the coming years,” Richman said.

The Early Head Start program was established in 1995 to build on the federal Head Start program that began in 1965 to promote school readiness and provide related services to preschoolers and their families. Early Head Start serves children from birth to three years of age and pregnant women to promote healthy development in the earliest years.  A list of grant recipients and amounts awarded follows.

Recipients of Early Head Start Program Funding

  • Community Services for Children Inc., Allentown $1,028,000 to serve an additional 24 children
  • Jefferson-Clarion Head Start Inc., Brookville $1,146,347 to serve an additional 84 children
  • Butler County Educational Service Center, Butler $403,274 to serve an additional 40 children
  • Franklin County Head Start, Chambersburg $618,526 to serve an additional 72 children
  • Private Industry Council of Westmoreland/Fayette Inc., Greensburg $487,387 to serve an additional 78 children
  • PathStone, Harrisburg $990,645 to serve an additional 72 children
  • Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg $1,186,084 to serve an additional 128 children
  • Keystone Service Systems Inc., Harrisburg $1,100,528 to serve an additional 70 children
  • Professional Family Care Services Inc., Johnstown $460,764 to serve an additional 72 children
  • Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit, Lewisburg $894,015 to serve an additional 76 children
  • Snyder Union Mifflin Child Development Inc., Mifflinsburg $140,235 to serve an additional 16 children
  • The Health Federation of Philadelphia, Philadelphia $472,081 to serve an additional 60 children
  • Maternity Care Coalition, Philadelphia $1,945,156 to serve an additional 168 children
  • School District of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh $443,448 to serve an additional 72 children
  • University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh $1,069,331 to serve an additional 140 children
  • Scranton-Lackawanna Human Development Agency Inc., Scranton $1,002,658 to serve an additional 108 children
  • Luzerne County Head Start Inc., Wilkes-Barre $1,132,403 to serve an additional 106 children
  • Lycoming/Clinton County Commission, Williamsport $2,703,310 to serve an additional 92 children
  • Community Progress Council Inc., York $1,415,875 to serve an additional 100 children

For additional information about Pennsylvania's Early Head Start programs, please visit the website of Pennsylvania Department of Education.  Media contacts: Michael Race (PDE), 717-783-9802, or Stacey Witalec (DPW), 717-787-4592.

In the Community

The IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association (ITCA) is pleased to announce the winner of the 2009 ITCA Regional Parent Leadership Award. This year’s unanimous choice of the Awards Committee and the Board of Directors is Kurt Kondrich from the State of Pennsylvania.

Support letters spoke of Mr. Kondrich's relentless advocacy towards acceptance and inclusion for special needs children, being an asset to the community he serves, his passion for children and programs, and his ability and willingness to connect with people on a personal level.  Also highlighted was his work with legislators, who now routinely recognize him during his bi-monthly visits to the capital.

The IDEA Infant and Toddler Association (ITCA) Parent Leadership Awards are given annually to acknowledge outstanding state parent leadership on behalf of the Part C program for infants and toddlers with developmental delays or disabilities and their families.  Parents may be nominated on the basis of significant contributions, in either a volunteer or paid capacity, during a specific period of time, or for exceptional efforts over a period of several years. These efforts may range from family support efforts, recruiting and/or training families, serving on committees, working on legislative initiatives etc.

The Parent Leadership award will be presented at the National Early Childhood Conference in Washington DC on December 6.  For additional information, please visit the IDEA Infant and Toddler Coordinators Association website.

The United Way of Mercer County hosted an Economic Summit on Early Childhood Investments on Friday, October 23, at Avalon at Buhl Park in Sharon, PA.  It was the first event of its kind in the area.  The Economic Summit conveyed the message that providing educational opportunities to children as young as birth to five years will actually increase their productive capabilities when they enter the workforce later in life. 
 
The keynote speaker, Judy Cameron, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh demonstrated how the return on investment for early childhood education is much greater than the return realized with remedial instruction for school-age children.  She also discussed how children who experience adverse conditions early in life run a far greater risk for adult heart disease and other illnesses, thus affecting their attendance and performance in the workplace.
 
Robert Kochems, Mercer County District Attorney, talked about the impact early education programs have on lowering juvenile delinquency and incarceration rates, thus making it more likely that children will develop into productive members of society.
 
Harriet Dichter, Deputy Secretary of the Office of Child Development and Early Learning, addressed state and local early childhood programming, focusing on the accountability of these programs so that people could see that their tax dollars are being invested wisely.  She also mentioned that our local Success by Six Initiative, funded by United Way, channels 100% of local monies directly to programming.
 
Lloyd Lamm, FNB Account Executive and member of the PA Early Learning Investment Commission, focused on local businesses already involved in supporting early childhood education.  He discussed why business leaders should view their support of early childhood education as a moral responsibility and a wise social and economic investment.
 
The event was co-sponsored by First National Bank and Joy Cone Company.

For additional information about Mercer County's Early Childhood Community Engagement Initiative, please contact Frasier B. Zahniser at 724-662-3141 or fbz1@psu.edu.  

Upcoming Events

February 19, 2010Language-based Approaches to Teaching Children with Autism

The President and Congress have recognized child care as an important part of economic recovery by targeting stimulus funds for the Child Care and Development Fund, Head Start, and Early Head Start. This is good news: child care is now clearly recognized as social infrastructure for economic development. The bad news is that even with stimulus funds, the supply of licensed center-based child care may shrink and jobs in the sector may actually fall because of the recession, restricting families' ability to find child care and employment once the economy is growing again.
 
This webinar, featuring Mildred Warner, Professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at Cornell University, will discuss:

  • The impact of the recession on the child care market
  • The Cornell Methodology and other tools for calculating the impacts of stimulus funds at the state and national levels
  • How to utilize an economic development rationale to inspire greater investments in early childhood systems
  • The discussion will be moderated by Billie Young, State Technical Assistance Specialist, National Child Care Information and Technical Assistance Center.

Please send any questions on this topic to Elisabeth Crum at crum@iwpr.org. Received questions will be incorporated into the presentation. 

Space is limited.  Reserve your Webinar seat now!

Title:  Assessing the Economic Impact of Child Care During Recessionary Times
Date: Wednesday, December 9, 2009
Time: 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EST

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

System Requirements:  PC-based attendees:  Required: Windows® 2000, XP Home, XP Pro, 2003 Server, Vista.  Macintosh®-based attendees:  Required: Mac OS® X 10.4 (Tiger®) or newer

Resources are available at the Cornell Linking Economic Development and Child Care Website.  Webinar Sponsors: the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the Peppercorn Foundation.  

 

Learn what’s new about the Early Childhood Standards for Infant/Toddler, Pre-kindergarten and Kindergarten. This training is appropriate for practitioners who work with infants, toddlers, pre-kindergarten, and kindergarten children in any capacity. This session will highlight why the revisions were made and how to read the new format of the Standards. The connections to the Standards Aligned System will be covered in detail. Participants must have copies of the standards and the Continuum to use during the training. Standards can be ordered through our printer fulfill@wavelinedirect.com or can be downloaded from the PA Key website – Click on Career Development in the middle of the page; click on Standards on the left navigation side. Click on book cover to download.

Participants will be able to:

  • Practice using the revised early childhood standards during the session
  • Discover the similarities and differences between the newly revised and older version of the early childhood standards
  • Connect the Continuum to the Standards booklets
  • Understand the Standards Aligned System

Participants must have a computer with internet access to participate in the Webinar. Internet Explorer 7.0 is needed to access the Webinar.

Act 48 hours will be offered. PQAS hours will be offered also.  Act 48 hours will only be available for those participants who register prior to the Session Date.

Materials List: Copies of the Early Learning Standards- Infant/Toddler and/ or Pre-kindergarten and/or Kindergarten and the Continuum. A Computer with internet access.

How to Get Materials: Order through our printer fulfill@wavelinedirect.com or download from the PA Key website.  Copies of all three Standards booklets plus the Continuum are $20.00. Copies of each of the Infant/Toddler or Pre-kindergarten or Kindergarten Standards booklet are $7.50.  Copies of the Continuum only are $5.00
 
Webinars will be held on the following dates and times:

  • 11/30/09 Monday 9:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.
  • 01/21/09 Thursday 9:00 A. M. 11:00 A.M.
  • 01/26/09 Tuesday 9:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.
  • 02/01/09 Monday 9:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.

How to Register for a Webinar Session:  To Register for one of these Webinar sessions, please log on to the PDE Webinar page and locate the Webinar by title “What’s New with the Early Childhood Standards?” Click “description” and then “register” or just click register on the top menu bar. Complete the registration form and submit.  On the day of the session, log on to the PDE Webinar page and join the session. 

For additional information, please contact Carolyn Gallo, Office of Child Development and Early Learning at cgallo@state.pa.us

 

The PA Key is seeking a dynamic individual with experience in providing technical assistance and monitoring to pre-school programs in a variety of early learning settings in Central and South Central PA.  This position requires strong computer skills and an interest in working on the development of an online ECE reporting system. Strong leadership, communication, and collaboration skills are also necessary.  
 
Required is a minimum of Bachelor’s Degree, preferred in early education or child development; Master’s degree in early education, child development or administration preferred.  Minimum of 5 years of high level work in the field of early learning with experience in partnership work and administration.  Position is based in South Central/Central PA.

Send cover letter and resume to Kelly Hollenbach, BCIU, 1111 Commons Blvd., P.O. Box 16050, Reading, PA  19612-6050 or email to kelhol@berksiu.org.  Online application is available at Berks Intermediate Unit website.  Deadline: November 27, 2009.  EOE

The PA Key is seeking a dynamic individual with experience in providing technical assistance and monitoring to pre-school programs in a variety of early learning settings in Southeast/South Central PA.  This position requires strong computer skills and an interest in working on the development of an online ECE reporting system. Strong leadership, communication, and collaboration skills are also necessary.  

Minimum of Bachelor’s Degree, preferred in early education or child development; Master’s degree in early education, child development or administration preferred.  Minimum of 5 years of high level work in the field of early learning with experience in partnership work and administration.  Position is based in Southeast/South Central PA.

Send cover letter and resume to Kelly Hollenbach, BCIU, 1111 Commons Blvd., P.O. Box 16050, Reading, PA  19612-6050 or email to kelhol@berksiu.org.  Online application available at Berks Intermediate Unit website.  Deadline: December 4, 2009.  EOE

The PA Key is seeking a dynamic individual with extensive knowledge of Head Start performance standards, experience working with infants and toddlers and demonstrated strong management and administrative skills to provide leadership and coordination in the development of a state-wide strategy (including Early Head Start) to serve infants and toddlers. 

Masters degree in early education, child development, social work, community organization, or administration preferred; minimum of 3 years supervisory experience and 5 years of high level work in the field of early learning with experience in partnership work and administration.  Full-time Harrisburg Based position available based on final confirmation of funding.

Send cover letter and resume to Kelly Hollenbach, BCIU, 1111 Commons Blvd., P.O. Box 16050, Reading, PA 19612-6050 or email to kelhol@berksiu.org.  Online application available at Berks Intermediate Unit website.  Deadline: December 4, 2009.  EOE

The PA Key is seeking an individual with experience in Head Start and infant/toddler programming to provide technical assistance and monitoring to infant/toddler programs in a variety of early learning settings primarily in the Eastern and South Central regions of the state.  Strong leadership, communication, and collaboration skills are also necessary.  

Master’s degree in early education, child development, special education, social work, or pediatric therapy preferred.  Minimum of 5 years of high level work in the field of early learning with experience in partnership work and administration.  Full time position available based on final confirmation of funding.  Works with programs primarily in Eastern/South Central PA.

Send cover letter and resume to Kelly Hollenbach, BCIU, 1111 Commons Blvd., P.O. Box 16050, Reading, PA  19612-6050 or email to kelhol@berksiu.org.  Online application available at Berks Intermediate Unit website.  Deadline: December 4, 2009.  EOE

The PA Key is seeking a dynamic individual with experience in early childhood education to coordinate and manage statewide professional development systems that meet the needs of early childhood professionals and improve educational outcomes for children. 

Masters degree in Early Childhood Education preferred; must be certified PQAS instructor; and have experience in the delivery of early childhood education; knowledge of current PA professional development and quality assurance initiatives, and experience in working with institutions of higher education.  Full-time position based in Harrisburg available immediately. 

Send cover letter and resume to Kelly Hollenbach, BCIU, 1111 Commons Blvd., P.O. Box 16050, Reading, PA  19612-6050 or email to kelhol@berksiu.org.  Online application available at Berks Intermediate Unit website.  Deadline:  December 4, 2009.  EOE

Resources for Early Learning Professionals

Once you start browsing in the Library of Congress teacher resources section you may never come up for air. Lesson plans, themed resources, and professional development activities all center around the use of primary sources.  Available are ready-to-use materials that bring the Library’s primary sources into the classroom.

If you have a new English language learner in your class who is not speaking, don't worry. According to language researcher Stephen Krashen, most new learners of English will go through a "silent period," where they are unwilling or unable to communicate orally, even though they understand much of what is going on around them.

Read the entire article on the Choice Literacy website.

"Dedicated to making kids readers for life." This website includes book recommendations by age group, books for boys, great page turners, interviews with authors, a "first lines" quiz, 12 tried-and-true ways to get kids reading, and more.  

 

The Early Childhood Education e-news is a project of the Pennsylvania Build Initiative and the Pennsylvania Departments of Education and Public Welfare to inform early learning professionals, the early childhood community, policymakers, community leaders and the public on developments in early childhood education and care in Pennsylvania.
 
Please feel free to forward this email to friends, family, and colleagues.
You may access archived copies at http://www.papromiseforchildren.com/.

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